Seeking in-depth answers

19.12.2016

Course participants. From left: Atle Mørk (NTNU), Hilde Krogh, Kristina Louise Hansen, Atle Dalva, Nina Pedersen, Kjetil Kaada, Lina Leknes, Katrine Ljones Karlsen, Lars Stemmerik (Unis), Andreas Bjørnestad, Eli Bjørkum, Bård Heggem (Polar bear watch) and Espen Simonstad (in front). (Photo: Luca Blazic)

Course participants.
From left: Atle Mørk (NTNU), Hilde Krogh, Kristina Louise Hansen, Atle Dalva, Nina Pedersen, Kjetil Kaada, Lina Leknes, Katrine Ljones Karlsen, Lars Stemmerik (Unis), Andreas Bjørnestad, Eli Bjørkum, Bård Heggem (Polar bear watch) and Espen Simonstad (in front).
(Photo: Luca Blazic)

 

The Alta and Gohta discoveries in Barents Sea South have increased interest in understanding their reservoir rocks. To learn more, 10 NPD staff attended a field course in Svalbard during September.

This expedition was headed by Lars Stemmerik, professor of geology at the University Centre in Svalbard (Unis), and Atle Mørk, adjunct professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNF) in Trondheim.

The aim was to boost the NPD’s general expertise on carbonate geology, since both discoveries are located in such rocks from the Permian and Carboniferous 250-360 million years ago.

Operated by Lundin, Alta and Gohta lie in karstified and brecciated limestones of the Røye and Ørn formations as well as the Gipsdalen group. Good analogues for these reservoirs can be studied on land in Svalbard.

Stemmerik says that carbonates are very different from the other reservoir rocks on the NCS for exploring in and producing from.

Previous discoveries off Norway have usually comprised permeable sandstones with good flow properties or less permeable chalk.

“A special aspect of carbonates is that these rocks may be changed chemically through various processes,” explains Stemmerik.

“The main features of their geology has been known for many years. A number of discoveries have been made in them globally, but only these two on the NCS. So people want to understand the details better.”

According to the NPD, the Barents Sea has the highest level of undiscovered resources on the NCS. And the estimate may change after new data from Barents Sea North has been evaluated.

 

Close look. Lina Leknes and colleagues study carbonate rocks on Svalbard to increase their knowledge of the sub-surface in the Barents Sea.

Close look.
Lina Leknes and colleagues study carbonate rocks on Svalbard to increase their knowledge of the sub-surface in the Barents Sea.


Topics: Geology