Svalbard fortress

19.12.2016
Both rocks and land forms vary greatly in Svalbard. These islands are a unique location for geologists who want to study structures which form petroleum reservoirs further south in the Barents Sea.

Text and photo: Alexey Deryabin, NPD

The NPD’s geologists used a drone-mounted camera to take photographs during their field trip.

The NPD’s geologists used a drone-mounted camera to take photographs during their field trip.

 

The landscape depicted here lies at the head of the Bille Fjord, and was photographed during NPD field work in 2013. Called the Fort, it is well known and frequently visited.

This area comprises karstified carbonate rocks laid down in warm seas and subsequently dissolved to create fissures, caves and so forth.

These Carboniferous rocks are 300-330 million years old and belong to the Ørn formation, the same lithological unit which forms the reservoir for the Alta discovery in the Barents Sea.

The NPD’s geologists used a drone-mounted camera to take photographs during their field trip. This provided good overview shots as well as detailed images of steep slopes.


Topics: Geology