First oil from the Barents Sea

goliat-illustrasjon-eni-norge-ingress
21.04.2017
Goliat is the first oil discovery to be developed in the Barents Sea. The operator, Eni Norge, commenced operations there in 2016, and the field is expected to produce for at least 15 years.

Goliat is the first oil field operated by Eni on the Norwegian shelf, and the company has an ownership interest of 65 per cent in the production licence. Statoil has an ownership interest of 35 per cent.

The field is located 50 kilometres southeast of the Snøhvit field and about 50 kilometres from the coast. Field development was approved in June 2009, using a floating production and storage vessel (FPSO).

The reservoir sandstone is shallow and complex, and has low temperature and pressure. Subsea development with landing was considered, but the recoverable oil volume was too small, and the oil too difficult to transport.

The gas produced along with the oil from Goliat is now injected back to the gas cap in the reservoir to provide pressure support. It may be relevant to export the gas at a later date.

According to the development plan for the field (PDO), hydrocarbons will be produced from the Realgrunnen and Kobbe reservoirs. The recoverable oil reserves from these reservoirs are estimated at 28 million standard cubic metres (176 million barrels) of oil.

The recoverable gas reserves are estimated at about eight billion cubic metres. Goliat is considered to be “a reasonably large field” with an infrastructure that is significant for developments of new oil discoveries in the area.

Work is ongoing in the Goliat production licence and in recently awarded production licences in the area to prove more oil deposits that can potentially be phased in to the Goliat facility.

The Barents Sea has a much more long-term perspective as regards resource development than the other areas on the Norwegian shelf, and the northern Barents Sea has yet to be opened for exploration activity.

Several interesting oil discoveries have been made in the southern Barents Sea in recent years. These discoveries have been named Johan Castberg, Alta, Gohta and Wisting, and are being considered for development.

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s task going forward will be to e.g. ensure that it is possible to phase in new discoveries to the Goliat infrastructure. The field will have the capacity to tie-in new oil discoveries starting in 2018.

 

Snadd will be drilled from Goliat’s subsea infrastructure and produced on the platform. This increases the estimated total production from Goliat to about 32 million standard cubic metres of oil equivalents (approx. 200 million barrels), mainly oil. (Illustration: Eni).

Snadd will be drilled from Goliat’s subsea infrastructure and produced on the platform. This increases the estimated total production from Goliat to about 32 million standard cubic metres of oil equivalents (approx. 200 million barrels), mainly oil. (Illustration: Eni).